The ultimate guide to Vesak Day 2022 in Singapore: 10 things to do this long weekend!

The ultimate guide to Vesak Day 2022 in Singapore: 10 things to do this long weekend!

Vesak Day, also known as Buddha Day, is a sacred day to millions of Buddhists worldwide. It commemorates the day that Buddha was born, attained enlightenment, and passed away. It gives us an opportunity for quiet reflection on Buddha’s teachings and the values of compassion, wisdom, and kindness.

It has evolved over time and brings different meanings to different people!

After 2 years of muted celebrations due to the pandemic, this year’s May 15 will see practitioners gathering and celebrating it in different ways. If you are trying to plan out your Vesak Day weekend to bask in the spirit of Vesak, check out these 10 things you can do!

1. Plan your calendar for your temple-hopping!

Torii Gate, Japan

Find an excuse to head out for the long weekend by visiting the many temples that are open. Use our directory to navigate the many online and offline activities. Who knows?

You might find yourself in the middle of a concert or peaceful chanting session.

Your directory is right here!

2. Three steps, One bow

Vesak 3-steps-1-bow Practice 31 May 2015 – Ramblings of a Monk
Photo Credit: KMSPKS

The three-step, one-bow ceremony is an expression of devotion and serves to lessen mental defilements or build virtue as one goes through the activity. This practice, which symbolically reminds us of the difficult but rewarding journey to enlightenment, has been passed down and has evolved into the 3-Step, 1-Bow we know today.

Book your free tickets here

3. Bless your pet!

Are you a paw-rent? This might just be for you! Following the Buddha’s Universal Love for all beings including animals, Thekchen Choling is organising their first animal blessing night event on the eve of Vesak Day! Happening on 14th May from 7.30pm to 10.30pm, there will be many fun-filled and interactive activities for you and your pet to enjoy!

Check it out here!

4. Check out some Food carnivals!

brown bread on black table
Unsplash

While tuning in to some peaceful Buddhist teaching (food for the heart), why not check out food for the body?

Check out food fairs organised by Buddhist Fellowship near newton or spicy tteokbokki and takoyaki at KMSPKS’s Vesak Carnival

5. Help fill the stomachs of the needy

person slicing on the wooden board
Unsplash

In the spirit of Buddha’s compassion shown to many beings, why not give back by volunteering at a Soup kitchen? There are multiple time slots and different tasks you can choose to volunteer with Willing Hearts. 

Hone your chopping and cooking skills here!

6. Find a quiet space to experience peace

Marina Barrage - Visit Singapore Official Site
Credits: Visit Singapore Website

Visit nature places with your insect repellant to reconnect with nature by taking in the good vibes. Plug into the sound of nature to meditate or try one of the meditation audio guides!

We highly recommend botanic gardens, marina barrage, or a nearby park!

7. Be a Buddy to seniors

Supporting seniors in going digital for life - Infocomm Media Development  Authority
Credit: IMDA

We often think that giving means the gift of money. This Vesak, we invite you to rethink the idea of generosity! Volunteer with YouthCorp SG & Healthhub to strengthen the digital literacy of our seniors by empowering them and reducing the waiting time at the polyclinics. 

Giving starts here!

8. Go vegetarian!

vegetable salad
Green Yum! Cred: Unsplash

In the spirit of non-harming, why not go vegetarian? The possibilities are endless with vegetarian food. Check out this sleek guide to vegetarian food places in Singapore!

FYI! Circuit Road Hawker Centre has one of the highest concentrations of vegetarian hawkers.

9. Watch a movie related to Buddhism

Buddha Netflix show - OnNetflix.ca
Netflix: Buddha (2013)

Netflix lover? Watch this live-action TV series about the Buddha. I was personally hooked on it!

Alternatively, watch a short < 30 mins documentary about the late famous zen master, Thich Nhat Hanh. Be inspired on Vesak!

10. Kick start your meditation habit

woman sitting on cliff overlooking mountains during daytime
Unsplash

Always trying to start the ‘meditation habit’ that every productive/mental health guru has been talking about? 

Why not join HOL’s free meditation challenge for 30 days? Who knows you might just start a new meditation habit that last!

Learning Empathy While Planting Trees.  #Mindfulchats With Conor

Learning Empathy While Planting Trees. #Mindfulchats With Conor

Handful of Leaves and Kusala Mag are in collaboration to share Inspiring stories sprinkled with Buddhist wisdom. Kusala Mag’s interview with Conor is reproduced in full here:

Kyle had the pleasure of chatting with Conor Beary, who has been actively involved with VWB, an NGO that is committed to creating opportunities for local economic development through the empowerment of community capability.

Cr: Conor Beary

How did Volunteer Without Borders (VWB) come about, and what does it mean to you?

VWB evolved from a collaboration between Track of The Tiger T.R.D (A provider of experiential education and registered tour company) a local community determined to protect their rights over their community forest, and local authorities that wished to preserve the forest from poachers and loggers.

Since its establishment in 2011, Volunteers Without Borders has partnered with Track of The Tiger and various communities in northern Thailand to provide volunteers and tourists with opportunities to improve the standard of living for many in less fortunate circumstances.

On a personal level, VWB has shown me the value of communication, teamwork, empathy and problem-solving in addressing the real complex issues which communities around us face. Through VWB I can make positive contributions to causes I hold dear and further develop as an individual. I see VWB as an organisation that acts as a catalyst for change, both internally and externally.

How many trees have been planted since the beginning?

The agroforestry project in Mae Wang has benefitted from the planting of over 6,000 NTFPs (Non- Timber Forest Products) over the last twelve months. Unfortunately, the pandemic has slowed our progress considerably, but aim to get back on track again soon.

How do you think growing up in Northern Thailand has affected your view of nature and your efforts to preserving the environment?

Growing up around Track of The Tiger T.R.D my brother and I was exposed to outdoor excursions and environmental conservation activities since young. Subsequently, it didn’t take long for me to develop a preference for the outdoors! Growing up in such an environment provided me with opportunities to develop physical skills essential to the development of a child.

The various environmental conservation activities taught me to apply empathy not only to other individuals but also to the environment.

The list of benefits derived from being around nature is extensive, and seemingly, everyone draws different positives. From my perspective, the outdoors and nature has always been a great source of entertainment. Mountains, rivers, forests, caves and seas all have their unique intrigue. Over the last couple of years, I’ve found that spending time to run activities at these sites, particularly environmental conservation activities have been eminently fulfilling.

As a result of our love for nature, one of our goals at VWB is to use our actions, whatever they may be, to make positive contributions to the environment or communities we are involved with.

Do you think Buddhist teachings can be a part of the solution to environmental issues? If yes, how can we relate that to it?

I certainly believe that Buddhist values and teachings can be applied as part of the solution for the environmental concerns which we face. Buddhism teaches us to love the world around us, and perform good deeds for the environment in which we live, just as we would for ourselves. However, to truly address the complex problems posed by environmental degradation over the past few centuries we must work with an open mind, utilising empathy and communication to integrate the teachings which are familiar to us with foreign ideas and values that may help us solve our dilemma.

Cr: Conor Beary

Can compassion be applied to nature?

Compassion can be applied to everything in life. If you’re willing to consider being compassionate to the people, animals and matters around you then compassion may become a part of your unique mindset, and may gradually alter your perspective of a multitude of subjects.

The Dalai Lama once said “ Compassion can be roughly defined in terms of a state of mind that is nonviolent, non-harming, and nonaggressive. It is a mental attitude based on the wish for others to be free of their suffering and is associated with a sense of commitment, responsibility and respect towards others.”

After analysing compassion from this point of view we can see that compassion can, and in my opinion, should be applied to others and nature.

What have been the greatest challenges you have encountered, and are perhaps still encountering while setting up and running VWB?

Running a non-profit organisation can prove extremely challenging. I am only a piece of the puzzle here and am fortunate enough to benefit from the help of everyone involved with us. As a volunteer organisation, we’re always looking for funding and volunteers who can help us achieve our objectives. The Covid-19 pandemic has made this task even more difficult.

In what ways can people actively get involved in your organisation?

Volunteers can help us by sharing our social media content, donating to one of the projects on https://give.asia/charity/volunteers-without-borders-foundation or contacting us directly to see how we can personalise collaboration!

What do you hope to achieve for VWB?

We want to use WVB as a platform for driving change in our local communities. Eventually, I hope that VWB will be able to fund education for those less fortunate, provide economic incentives for locals to preserve their local forests and help educate student groups through volunteering activities. We want to act as a catalyst for the change we wish to see in our communities.

Any act of kindness you’ve ever experienced during your VWB activities?

I’ve been on the receiving end of kindness during VWB activities several times. It is difficult to single out any one moment as my favourite, but kindness from the members of the community in which you are trying to assist often leaves a lasting imprint in your memories.

During our first tree-planting event at the agroforestry project in Mae Wang, locals hustled and bustled all day to ensure that we would be able to perform our duties to the best of our abilities. Their genuine smiles and words of encouragement serve as ample motivation.

If there is a message for the world, what would it be?

To practice empathy extensively. To actualise the changes you want to see in your community you must first understand those within them.

Cr: Conor Beary


Explore more about VWB here.

Volunteers Without Borders (VWB) is a non-profit foundation established as a vehicle to provide volunteer funding and hands-on support for communities and schools, under its unique approach to Community Based Ecotourism (CBET) development. We are convinced that the solution to establishing viability for CBET lies in establishing a private sector driven pilot project that is successful in delivering: financial, social and environmental benefits on a scale that will force governments and the private sector to reconsider ecotourism and biodiversity conservation over the non-sustainable, but purportedly more profitable (short term) options of forest encroachment for agriculture, mining, logging and exploitation of the forest product.

Alternatively, hop over to Kusala Mag for more of such amazing stories!