#WW: ☄️ Chaos at the office and how we can work with it

#WW: ☄️ Chaos at the office and how we can work with it

Wholesome Wednesdays (WW): Bringing you curated positive content on Wednesdays to uplift your hump day.

The last public holiday felt like ages ago. The office space or your team feels chaotic. How can we work with chaos? How do astronauts cope with stress?

1. Astronauts, Heartbeat, and our unpleasant emails

2. Chaos at office! How to deal with it the Buddhist way

Astronauts, Heartbeat, and our unpleasant emails

blue and white cartoon character

What’s going on here & why we like it

Ryan Holiday, a famous stoic, shares how astronauts are chosen for their missions into space and how they keep regulated under stressful situations. We like how Ryan brings astronauts’ training into how we can train to deal with adversity even better!

“Often times, the way we respond to something makes it worse. We tell ourselves something is unfair.”

Wise Steps

How often do we prepare ourselves for hardship? Wanting things to be how we want them to be rather than the way things are? Running through scenarios of negativity that one might face in the day prepares one for the uncertainty that might lie ahead.

P.S. “Premeditatio malorum (“the pre-meditation of evils”) is a Stoic exercise of imagining things that could go wrong or be taken away from us. It helps us prepare for life’s inevitable setbacks and develop resilience in the face of uncertainty. “- Ryan Holiday

Check out the awesome Tiktok below!

Chaos at office! How to deal with it the Buddhist way

brown wooden house near green trees during daytime

What’s going on here & why we like it

Pema Chodron, a famous western Tibetan nun, shares how we can deal with chaos in the best way possible. She provides us with 3 ways we can deal with chaos such as going to places which scare us and using poison as a medicine.

“We breathe it in for everybody. This poison is not just our personal misfortune, our fault, our blemish, our shame—it’s part of the human condition.”

Wise Steps

Pema Chodron introduces us to the Buddhist contemplation and meditation of Tonglen. Taking in the negative energy from ourselves and others and emitting the positive energy into the environment. Super cool and worth a short at visualisation/ contemplation

Check out the article!


Film Review:  Saffron Heart – A Little Monk Finding Home (PG)

Film Review: Saffron Heart – A Little Monk Finding Home (PG)

Buddhist Film Reviews is a partnership series between HOL & THIS Buddhist Film Festival 2021 (25 Sept – 8 Oct’21). Themed “Open your mind”, THISBFF 2021 features 15 thought-provoking documentaries and feature films from 12 countries. 


TLDR: A young monk is tasked to solve a series of puzzles in order to return home, but discovers something else in the process. 

The definition of ‘home’ changes throughout one’s life. Whether we consider it synonymous to the place, people, or just a sense of safety and security, ‘home’ may be where the heart is – but even the most permanent residences are inevitably transitory in nature.

It is a lesson young Lobsang learns as he is sent to a Buddhist monastery at the tender age of ten. Uprooted from home and thrust into an unfamiliar environment, he quickly finds himself missing his home and his parents, and that yearning turns into several failed attempts at escaping the monastery.

In response, his compassionate teacher draws him a map-quest consisting of a series of eight puzzles that upon solving would allow Lobsang to return home.

“Why do deers need an umbrella?”

“How do you hide a lion’s roar in a pot?”

“What is the difference between two identical fishes?”

Crafted in relation to the Eight Auspicious Signs in Tibetan Buddhism, each puzzle guides Lobsang towards a piece of Buddhist wisdom, with the young monk’s curiosity soon taking him around the monastery and out. Experimenting with meditation. Scouring dense forests and packed libraries. Even having a brush with the supernatural. Lobsang’s adventure is laced with philosophical questions on suffering and attachment, yet because of its colourful analogies, the lessons he takes away are accessible and creative takes on the Buddha’s teachings. 

Filled with inquisitive questions on every encounter, Lobsang ensures that the audience tags closely along when it comes to learning and growth.

The film takes place in Drepung Gomang Monastery in Mundgod, India, where 2000 monks currently reside. Giving us a glimpse into the everyday lives of Tibetan monks living in India, from hours of chanting and reading, to the unorthodox practice of Buddhist debate in Tibetan Buddhism, life as a monk centred heavily on education for these young men, covering not just academic texts but also philosophical discourses on logic and conceptualisation. 

Yet, practice for them also extends into laborious tasks like washing robes and kneading dough, dispelling any myths about how easy monkhood might be for Lobsang and any unknowing viewer. 

After all, renunciation for them was not meant to be an escape from the monotony of life, but to study life itself so they can share their knowledge and wisdom with others.

Beyond the Buddhist lessons, Saffron Heart is at heart also a story of friendship. 

Throughout the 90-minute film, we see a blossoming relationship between Lobsang and his senior novice monk Tashi, who was assigned to guide him along. Though the exposition in dialogue was at times lengthy, Lobsang and Tashi’s natural chemistry made them an endearing pair to watch and root for on their individual journeys of growth.

While the song choices for some scenes felt out of place at times, the cinematography was stellar throughout the film. Capturing Mundgod’s scenic mountainous landscapes and Drepung Gomang’s intricate architecture, any frame in Saffron Heart would not be out of place as a still. 

Despite Lobsang’s initial feelings of entrapment and longing for home, the mise-en-scene of scenes in the movie conveys a sense of spaciousness throughout the film. Living a completely different life in our concrete jungle here in Singapore, it made me wonder about the parallels between freedom, our environment and the states of mind.  

The debut feature film of filmmaker and music composer Paul McLay, Saffron Heart comes from simple motivations: a desire to help and to inspire. Channelling all proceeds from the film towards Tibetan refugees living in a conservation area in South India, the effort to raise funds for the displaced parallels the film’s central narrative of finding wisdom amidst adversity and change. 

Framed in a way that is suitable for all ages – from kids curious about Buddhism, to adults looking for a heart-warming tale – Saffron Heart serves as a reminder that as we go about our personal journeys, it’s not the destination but the process that serves as our biggest takeaway.


Liked what our author experienced? Book your tickets right now!

Follow THISBFF on Telegram or Facebook

Help us spread more goodness to the world

X