#WW: 😪”Perfection is like death”: Is it bad to be average?

#WW: 😪”Perfection is like death”: Is it bad to be average?

Wholesome Wednesdays (WW): Bringing you curated positive content on Wednesdays to uplift your hump day.

In a society where 98/100 is often seen as not good enough, what do we do? We can chase that perfection which online influencers (linkedin/ instagram etc) showcase to us. Or we can perhaps be chasing what matters to us. So, is being average okay? Here are 2 stories to tweak your perspective

1. Is it bad to be average? Especially if we don’t chase wealth?

2. Perfection is like death. There’s no room for something to come in.

Is it bad to be average? Especially if we don’t chase wealth?

Cr: The Woke Salary man

What’s going on here & why do we like it?

The woke salaryman, a financial blog that shares awesome finance tips, shares a reflection on being average. We are often sold the IG dream of early retirement and get rich quick stories. These can make us feel small or feel determined to chase them. We like this sharing because it is pretty Dhammic in nature. It talks about downsizing the things we want and recognising the limitations of wealth. This echoes our podcast on Buddhism & wealth too!

“You might want to care less about what average is and focus more on what makes you happy. Comparing can be an endless pit of despair”

Wise Steps

Where are you now on your path towards ‘perfection’? Are you deep in it or not at all? Seek the answer within and decide where contentment could be in your life.

Check out the post below!

Perfection is like death. There’s no room for something to come in.

Cr: Unsplash

What’s going on here & why do we like it?

Pema Chodron, a renowned Tibet Buddhist Nun, shares on her approach towards perfection and why it is more like death than life. She beautifully uses nature to describe our chase towards the perfection of things around us. We like it because she blends her sharing with a balance of nature and Dhamma. Her sharing probes deep into our chase for perfection and how we often set ourselves up for failure.

“We are killing the moment by controlling our experience. Doing this is setting ourselves up for failure, because sooner or later, we’re going to have an experience we can’t control: our house is going to burn down, someone we love is going to die, we’re going to find out we have cancer, or somebody’s going to spill tomato juice all over our white suit.”

Wise Steps

Take a pause to see what you are currently pursuing right now. Does it give room for failure? Does it give room for change? If the answer is no, we then need to reflect if we are mentally ready when things don’t go our way.

Maybe we don’t need to flatten out all the rough spots and imperfections for a smooth ride in life.

Read it here


#WW: ☄️ Chaos at the office and how we can work with it

#WW: ☄️ Chaos at the office and how we can work with it

Wholesome Wednesdays (WW): Bringing you curated positive content on Wednesdays to uplift your hump day.

The last public holiday felt like ages ago. The office space or your team feels chaotic. How can we work with chaos? How do astronauts cope with stress?

1. Astronauts, Heartbeat, and our unpleasant emails

2. Chaos at office! How to deal with it the Buddhist way

Astronauts, Heartbeat, and our unpleasant emails

blue and white cartoon character

What’s going on here & why we like it

Ryan Holiday, a famous stoic, shares how astronauts are chosen for their missions into space and how they keep regulated under stressful situations. We like how Ryan brings astronauts’ training into how we can train to deal with adversity even better!

“Often times, the way we respond to something makes it worse. We tell ourselves something is unfair.”

Wise Steps

How often do we prepare ourselves for hardship? Wanting things to be how we want them to be rather than the way things are? Running through scenarios of negativity that one might face in the day prepares one for the uncertainty that might lie ahead.

P.S. “Premeditatio malorum (“the pre-meditation of evils”) is a Stoic exercise of imagining things that could go wrong or be taken away from us. It helps us prepare for life’s inevitable setbacks and develop resilience in the face of uncertainty. “- Ryan Holiday

Check out the awesome Tiktok below!

Chaos at office! How to deal with it the Buddhist way

brown wooden house near green trees during daytime

What’s going on here & why we like it

Pema Chodron, a famous western Tibetan nun, shares how we can deal with chaos in the best way possible. She provides us with 3 ways we can deal with chaos such as going to places which scare us and using poison as a medicine.

“We breathe it in for everybody. This poison is not just our personal misfortune, our fault, our blemish, our shame—it’s part of the human condition.”

Wise Steps

Pema Chodron introduces us to the Buddhist contemplation and meditation of Tonglen. Taking in the negative energy from ourselves and others and emitting the positive energy into the environment. Super cool and worth a short at visualisation/ contemplation

Check out the article!


#WW: 🥺My husband’s cheating led me to the Dhamma

#WW: 🥺My husband’s cheating led me to the Dhamma

Wholesome Wednesdays (WW): Bringing you curated positive content on Wednesdays to uplift your hump day.

2 stories for you today!

The week of love is coming up! We take a creative (maybe contrarian) spin this week on sharing a broken love can lead to the Dhamma and how to love our work.

1. How my husband’s affair led me to the Dhamma

2. How to love your work

How my husband’s affair led me to the Dhamma

broken blue ceramic plate
Unsplash

What’s going on here

Venerable Pema Chodron, a famous Tibetan Nun & author of “When Things Fall Apart“, shares how she became a Buddhist! How something really dark in her life transformed her into a Dhamma practitioner.

Why we like it

We can sometimes think of monastics as people who led comfortable lives and decided to renounce all worldly possessions. However, some come to the Dhamma and monastic life from a deeply traumatic experience. This shows the humanising part of Sangha and an eye-opener to how she dealt with the pain when she was enjoying the heights of her career and life.

“What i was feeling (anger & negativity) was a key to something rather than an obstacle to something.”

Wise Steps

When things fall apart, where do we turn to? Do we allow ourselves to feel the pain or numb it away?

Watch it here or below

How to love your work

white desk lamp beside green plant
Unsplash

What’s going on here

School of Life (SOL) makes a video on how we can have a better relationship with our work. The five mins video touches on aspirations and finding meaning in our work. Loving your work, SOL argues, doesn’t start with your work.

Why we like it

With 1 in 4 Singaporeans planning to resign within the next few months, this matter more than ever. This video is easy to digest and makes us think deeper about what we want. It challenges us to drop the expectations of comparison with others’ lives.

” Work cannot fix the deficit of love. We should enjoy work on its own terms”

Wise Steps

Are you in a slump? Maybe it is time to slow down and acknowledge where you feel unsatisfied about your work-life. Asking yourself much needed questions about work and career can spark new insights!

Enjoy the video here or below!

Want to dive deeper and get something tangible? Check out School of Life’s Gratitude cards or Confidence flashcards


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